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Botox Dosage

Botox Dosage for Overactive Bladder

For treating urine leakage due to an overactive bladder caused by neurological causes, the recommended Botox dosage is 200 units per treatment session. You may be sedated (or not), or you may need general anesthesia, depending on several factors. Treatment sessions can be repeated as soon as the effects wear off (but no sooner than every 12 weeks), although the effects usually last for quite a while longer (around 42 to 48 weeks) for most people.
You will need to be treated with antibiotics for one to three days before and after each treatment.
For treating overactive bladder symptoms not due to a neurological condition, the recommended Botox dosage is 100 units per treatment session. Treatment sessions can be repeated as soon as the effects wear off, but no sooner than every 12 weeks. The effects usually last for quite a while longer (around 24 weeks, on average). You will need to be treated with antibiotics for one to three days before and after each treatment.

General Information on Dosing With Botox

Considerations for people taking Botox include the following:
  • The medication comes in injectable form. It is delivered directly into the muscles that are causing the problems. When treating severe sweating, Botox is injected directly into the underarm.
  • When treating misaligned eyes (strabismus), special techniques, sometimes using the electrical signals from the muscles, must be used to make sure that the injections are given in the right place.
  • Your healthcare provider may choose to use an anesthetic cream to numb your skin, but this is not necessary. If you are worried about pain, be sure to ask your healthcare provider about using an anesthetic cream.
  • The effects of Botox are not permanent. You will need to receive injections periodically in order to maintain the drug's effects.
  • For the medication to work properly, it must be taken as prescribed.
  • If you are unsure about anything related to your Botox dosage, please talk to your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.
Last reviewed by: Kristi Monson, PharmD
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