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Nerve Injury During a Myomectomy

Nerve injury during a myomectomy, although not usually serious, is something to take into account when considering this form of surgery. In extreme cases, permanent nerve damage can occur, resulting in long-term numbness and loss of strength. Keep in mind that it is impossible not to cut any nerves during surgery, so some form of nerve injury during a myomectomy (usually temporary) will occur.

Nerve Injury During a Myomectomy: An Overview

Your brain and spinal cord are responsible for the function, control, and coordination of bodily activities, including providing for the senses of feeling and movement. Your body uses nerves as connections between the brain or spinal cord and the specific locations.
Nerves can connect into muscles to allow movement. Nerves can also connect with the skin to provide for feeling. Nerves from the spinal cord and brain are relatively large in size. As the nerves branch off from the main stem, they become smaller in size and their function becomes more specialized.
Nerves that are related to feeling are quite small. Because of their size and location, these nerves are often cut during surgery. In fact, it is impossible not to cut any nerves during surgery.
However, the abnormal skin feeling caused by this is usually in a very small area. In extreme cases, permanent nerve damage can occur, resulting in long-term numbness and loss of strength. Surgery can be attempted to repair the nerve, but often with limited success.
Last reviewed by: Arthur Schoenstadt, MD
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