Advertisement

Nystatin and Breastfeeding

Before using nystatin, nursing women should first consult their healthcare providers. The drug is poorly absorbed into the bloodstream and is not expected to ever actually reach the breast milk. In general, it is considered safe for breastfeeding women (and their infants) to use nystatin.

Is Nystatin Safe for Breastfeeding Women?

It is unknown if nystatin passes through breast milk. However, it is often considered to be an acceptable medication for use in breastfeeding women. If you are breastfeeding, you should talk with your healthcare provider about taking nystatin.

Using Nystatin While Breastfeeding

For most medications, it is very important to know if the medication passes through breast milk. However, this is not the case for nystatin. Nystatin is very poorly absorbed into the bloodstream (even when taken by mouth) and as a result, is not expected to ever actually reach the breast milk (since medications must travel through the bloodstream before they can be passed through breast milk).
Additionally, nystatin is approved for use even in newborns. Therefore, it would not be dangerous for a newborn to be exposed to nystatin through breast milk (even though this is highly unlikely to occur).
For especially resistant thrush infections, nystatin is sometimes prescribed to both a breastfeeding mother and an infant. In this case, the infant is usually given nystatin oral suspension (liquid), and the mother is given nystatin cream for use on the nipples.
Nystatin ointment should not be used, since it could expose the infant to an unacceptably high level of petrolatum. Women are usually advised to wipe off any excess cream before each nursing session.

Talking With Your Healthcare Provider

You should talk with your healthcare provider about breastfeeding while taking nystatin. Each woman's situation is different, and you and your healthcare provider understand your situation best. After considering what you want and expect, as well as your current health situation, you and your healthcare provider can make a shared decision that is right for you.
Last reviewed by: Kristi Monson, PharmD
Advertisement
6 Quick Tips for Getting Kids to Take Medicine