Women Channel
Topics
Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

Women Articles A-Z

What Is Sprintec Used For? - Your Body Postpartum

This page contains links to eMedTV Women Articles containing information on subjects from What Is Sprintec Used For? to Your Body Postpartum. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • What Is Sprintec Used For?
    Sprintec is a prescription medication that is used for preventing pregnancy. This article from the eMedTV site describes the birth control pill in more detail, explains how it works, and discusses common off-label Sprintec uses.
  • What Is Sronyx Used For?
    Sronyx is a prescription medicine that is used for preventing pregnancy. This page from the eMedTV site describes how this form of birth control works and lists some of the common off-label Sronyx uses (such as for treating PMDD or acne).
  • What Is the Copper IUD Used For?
    As explained in this eMedTV page, the copper IUD is licensed to prevent pregnancy for up to 10 to 12 years. This page takes a closer look at on how the copper IUD works and lists some off-label uses for this highly effective contraceptive.
  • What Is the OTC Oxybutynin Patch Used For?
    As this eMedTV page explains, the OTC oxybutynin patch is used to treat an overactive bladder in women. This page takes a closer look at what this nonprescription drug is used for, how it works, and if it is safe for children and men.
  • What Is Thyroid USP Used For?
    Thyroid USP is used for treating an underactive thyroid and other various thyroid problems. This page on the eMedTV Web site further explains what the medication is used for and explores possible off-label Thyroid USP uses.
  • What Is Viorele Used For?
    Viorele is mainly taken to prevent pregnancy. However, as this article from the eMedTV archives explains, there are also some unapproved uses for Viorele. This resource discusses these uses and also explains how the birth control pill works.
  • What Results Can You Expect After Abominal Hysterectomy?
    You can expect certain results with an abdominal hysterectomy, as this multimedia clip explains.
  • What Results Can You Expect From a Bunionectomy?
    This video clip discusses the various results you can expect from a bunionectomy.
  • What Results Can You Expect From a Myomectomy?
    This multimedia clip describes the possible results of a myomectomy.
  • What Results Can You Expect With a Laparoscopic Tubal Ligation?
    This interactive video describes the results you can expect after a tubal ligation.
  • What Results Can You Expect with Diagnostic Laparoscopy?
    What Results Can You Expect?
  • What Will Happen Without a Bunionectomy?
    This clip describes some of the problems you may have if you choose not to have a bunionectomy.
  • What You Can Expect Without a Myomectomy
    You may wonder what you can expect without a myomectomy. This eMedTV page explains how your situation may get better, stay the same, or worsen without the procedure. Discuss all this with your doctor; the decision, however, is ultimately yours.
  • What's Involved With an IUI?
    As this eMedTV page explains, intrauterine insemination (IUI) is just one method available for couples dealing with infertility. This segment describes this procedure in detail, outlining what to expect, the benefits and risks, success rates, and costs.
  • When in Your Menstrual Cycle Should You Start Taking Provera?
    This page of the eMedTV Web site explains when in your menstrual cycle you should start taking Provera. Depending on the reason this medicine is being used, Provera may be started on day 1, day 16, or day 21 and taken daily for 5 to 14 days.
  • When It's Time for Fertility Testing
    You've been trying to conceive for months, but you're still not pregnant -- should you get tested? This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at when it's time to consider fertility testing, the specific tests your doctor may recommend, and more.
  • While in the Hospital (Abdominal Hysterectomy)
    This clip explains after a abdominal hysterectomy what will happen as you move from the recovery room to a regular hospital room.
  • Why Bunion Surgery Is Recommended?
    This video clip explains why your healthcare provider may suggest bunion surgery.
  • Why Your Doctor Is Recommending a Myomectomy?
    This video discusses the purpose of a myomectomy and explains who it is recommended for.
  • Wound Breakdown -- Abdominal Hysterectomy Risks
    This video explains why some wounds may not heal well after an abdominal hysterectomy.
  • Wound Breakdown Following a Myomectomy
    Wound breakdown following a myomectomy could result in an irregular or noticeable scar. As this eMedTV Web page explains, wound breakdown occurs more frequently in people who have severe swelling, infection, or who generally heal poorly.
  • Xeomin
    Xeomin is used to relax the muscles that cause eyelid twitching, wrinkles, neck pain, and other problems. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at this prescription medicine, including how it works, how it is administered, safety precautions, and more.
  • Xeomin and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this page of the eMedTV site, it is unknown if Xeomin (incobotulinumtoxinA) passes through human breast milk. This article examines whether it is safe for women who are breastfeeding to use Xeomin and what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Xeomin and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, women who are pregnant should only receive Xeomin (incobotulinumtoxinA) if the benefits outweigh the risks. This article explains why Xeomin is a Category C drug and lists some of the problems it caused during animal studies.
  • Xeomin Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment discusses, dosing guidelines for Xeomin will depend on several factors, such as the condition being treated and other medications you are taking. This page also lists some details on what to expect during treatment with this drug.
  • Xeomin Drug Interactions
    It may not be safe to combine Xeomin with products like Botox, Benadryl, or Spiriva. This eMedTV Web selection contains a detailed list of drugs that may cause interactions with Xeomin and describes the complications that these reactions may cause.
  • Xeomin Injections
    A doctor may prescribe Xeomin injections to treat eyelid twitching, neck pain, or wrinkles. This eMedTV article describes how this prescription drug works to relax muscles and lists some side effects. A link to more information is also included.
  • Xeomin Medication Information
    This eMedTV page contains information on Xeomin, a medication prescribed for wrinkles, eyelid twitching, and neck pain. This article explains how this drug works and covers safety precautions. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Xeomin Overdose
    Difficulty swallowing and voice changes could occur if you receive too much Xeomin (incobotulinumtoxinA). This eMedTV article describes other possible overdose symptoms and describes some of the possible ways a doctor may treat these problems.
  • Xeomin Overview
    As explained in this eMedTV article, if you have eyelid twitching, neck pain, or wrinkles between your eyebrows, you may benefit from Xeomin injections. A brief overview of this medication is included in this page, as well as a link to more details.
  • Xeomin Side Effects
    Headaches, droopy eyelids, and infections are among the most commonly reported Xeomin side effects. This eMedTV Web selection offers a detailed list of other problems this product might cause, including serious reactions that require medical treatment.
  • Xeomin Uses
    Xeomin is prescribed to relax certain muscles that cause problems like eyelid twitching and neck pain. This eMedTV resource examines what Xeomin is used for, including approved and unapproved uses, as well as details on how the product works.
  • Xeomin Warnings and Precautions
    People who have certain allergies or infections should not receive Xeomin. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes some of the safety warnings and precautions to be aware of with Xeomin, including details on potentially serious problems that may occur.
  • Yasemen
    This page from the eMedTV library explains how Yasmin works to prevent pregnancy. This Web page features a brief overview of this birth control pill, including what to tell your doctor before taking it. Yasemen is a common misspelling of Yasmin.
  • Yasmen
    Yasmin is a prescription birth control pill that works to prevent pregnancy in several ways. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of how Yasmin works and lists possible side effects of the contraceptive. Yasmen is a common misspelling of Yasmin.
  • Yasmin
    Yasmin is an oral contraceptive that is used to prevent pregnancy. This part of the eMedTV Web site discusses Yasmin in more detail, including information on how the contraceptive works, when and how to take it, and what to do if you miss a dose.
  • Yasmin and Acne Review
    Women who are taking Yasmin may notice an improvement in their acne. This eMedTV article explains that although Yasmin is not approved for treating acne, certain hormones contained in the birth control pill may help treat the condition in women.
  • Yasmin and Breastfeeding
    Generally, women should avoid taking Yasmin while breastfeeding. This part of the eMedTV archives offers a more in-depth look at Yasmin and breastfeeding, including information on possible problems the drug could cause in a nursing infant.
  • Yasmin and Pregnancy
    The FDA has determined that Yasmin is not safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV Web page describes the problems that Yasmin can cause to a fetus. If you are taking Yasmin and pregnancy occurs, you should stop taking the drug right away.
  • Yasmin and Weight Gain
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, weight gain does not appear to be a common side effect of Yasmin. This article further discusses this topic, and provides a list of suggestions on how to avoid weight gain while taking the birth control pill.
  • Yasmin Birth Control Pills
    Yasmin birth control pills are prescribed to help prevent pregnancy. This eMedTV presentation looks at the drug, including side effects (weight gain, acne), interactions, dosing, and precautions.
  • Yasmin Contraceptive
    The oral contraceptive Yasmin is commonly used to prevent unintended pregnancy. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains how Yasmin is different from other traditional oral contraceptives and describes how it works to prevent pregnancy.
  • Yasmin Dangers
    Yasmin may slightly increase the risk of breast cancer or cervical cancer. This eMedTV page discusses other potential dangers of Yasmin, lists some of the common side effects of the drug, and offers warnings on who should not use this birth control pill.
  • Yasmin Dosage
    When taking Yasmin for birth control, there is only one standard dosage. This eMedTV segment takes a detailed look at what to do if you miss any of your doses and provides some tips for when and how to best take your Yasmin dosage.
  • Yasmin Drug Interactions
    If you take certain medications with Yasmin, drug interactions may occur. This page of the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at medications that can cause potentially negative interactions with Yasmin, such as antibiotics, NSAIDs, and heparin.
  • Yasmin Medication Information
    Yasmin is a prescription oral contraceptive commonly used for preventing pregnancy. This eMedTV resource provides more information on the medication, including details on how Yasmin works and how effective it is at preventing pregnancy.
  • Yasmin Overdose
    A Yasmin overdose may cause vaginal bleeding, vomiting, or high blood potassium levels. This eMedTV resource describes these and other effects of a Yasmin overdose and discusses possible treatment options that are available.
  • Yasmin Risks
    Combined oral contraceptives (such as Yasmin) increase the likelihood of blood clots and strokes. This eMedTV segment explores other potential risks with Yasmin and also describes some of the common side effects of this birth control pill.
  • Yasmin Safety Information
    As with any method of birth control, there are certain risks associated with the use of Yasmin. This eMedTV article provides general safety information on Yasmin, including details on what side effects may occur with this particular oral contraceptive.
  • Yasmin Side Effects
    Common Yasmin side effects may include nausea, headaches, and back pain. This portion of the eMedTV library takes an in-depth look at these and other possible side effects, including those that may require immediate medical care.
  • Yasmin Uses
    Yasmin is used for preventing pregnancy. However, as this eMedTV article explains, Yasmin uses can also include treating acne, PMDD, and irregular menstrual periods, although these are off-label uses. This page also explains how the drug works.
  • Yasmin Vs. Plan B
    While Plan B and Yasmin are both used to prevent pregnancy, they are used in different ways. This eMedTV resource explores some of the similarities and differences between Yasmin vs. Plan B and describes the effects of both medications.
  • Yasmin Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Yasmin if you have certain health conditions, such as heart disease or kidney disease. This eMedTV page describes other Yasmin warnings and precautions, including what to tell your doctor before taking the contraceptive.
  • Yassmin
    As this eMedTV page explains, Yasmin is a prescription birth control pill used to prevent pregnancy. This Web article explains how Yasmin works and also describes possible side effects of the contraceptive. Yassmin is a common misspelling of Yasmin.
  • Yaz
    Yaz is an oral contraceptive that can also help treat acne and PMDD. This article on the eMedTV Web site discusses how the drug works, describes when and how to take it, and explains what you should know before using this form of oral contraception.
  • Yaz and Antibiotics
    There is a potential interaction between antibiotics and Yaz. As this eMedTV page explains, there have been reports of accidental pregnancy in women taking birth control pills and certain antibiotics together.
  • Yaz and Breastfeeding
    Women are typically advised to avoid combined contraceptives (such as Yaz) when breastfeeding. This eMedTV segment provides more information on Yaz and breastfeeding, and describes the problems that may occur if you use the drug while nursing.
  • Yaz and Pregnancy
    You should not intentionally use Yaz during pregnancy. This eMedTV page describes the serious problems that could occur if you take it while pregnant (such as miscarriages) and also explains what to do if you are taking Yaz and pregnancy occurs.
  • Yaz and Weight Gain
    Women may gain weight while taking Yaz. However, as this eMedTV Web page explains, it is difficult to tell if the weight gain is caused by Yaz or other factors. This page also describes what you can do if this problem occurs with this drug.
  • Yaz Birth Control Pills
    This eMedTV Web segment looks at Yaz birth control pills. Information covered includes possible side effects (including weight gain), drug interactions, warnings, precautions, and much more.
  • Yaz Contraceptive
    Not only do people use Yaz for birth control; they may also take it for the treatment of acne. This eMedTV resources discusses the contraceptive's uses in more detail, explains how Yaz works, and explores the effectiveness of this form of birth control.
  • Yaz Dangers
    Yaz is generally not recommended for women with high blood pressure. This eMedTV Web page explores other potential dangers of Yaz and describes some of the side effects and complications that may occur with this medicine.
  • Yaz Dosage
    There is only one standard Yaz dosage. This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers suggestions on when and how to take Yaz, and provides detailed information on what to do if you miss any doses of the contraceptive.
  • Yaz Drug Interactions
    Antibiotics, NSAIDs, and some seizure medicines are some of the drugs that may interact negatively with Yaz. This eMedTV segment lists other medications that may cause Yaz drug interactions and describes the complications that may occur.
  • Yaz Effectiveness
    Clinical studies have shown the effectiveness of Yaz for several different uses. This segment from the eMedTV site discusses the effectiveness of the drug for preventing pregnancy, treating symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and treating acne.
  • Yaz for Acne
    Doctors may treat acne with Yaz, a prescription birth control pill. This selection from the eMedTV archives discusses other approved uses for Yaz and explains how the oral contraceptive works for treating acne.
  • Yaz Medication Information
    Yaz is an oral contraceptive used for preventing pregnancy and treating acne and PMDD. This eMedTV article contains more information about the medication, including information on how Yaz is different from other birth control pills.
  • Yaz Overdose
    You should seek immediate medical care if you believe you have overdosed on Yaz. This eMedTV resource describes the possible symptoms of a Yaz overdose, some of which can be quite dangerous. This page also covers possible treatment options.
  • Yaz Risks
    Yaz can increase your chance of developing blood clots, strokes, and heart attacks. This page on the eMedTV site discusses other potential risks with Yaz and lists some of the more common side effects that have been reported with this medication.
  • Yaz Safety Information
    It is important to review the safety information for Yaz before you start this method of birth control. This eMedTV page explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using Yaz and lists some of the problems that may occur with this drug.
  • Yaz Side Effects
    Headaches, a decreased sex drive, and weight gain are among the common side effects of Yaz. This eMedTV resource discusses these and other Yaz side effects in more detail, including which side effects may require immediate medical attention.
  • Yaz Uses
    Yaz is used for preventing pregnancy, as well as treating acne and PMDD in women. This eMedTV segment explains that there are also several off-label Yaz uses, such as treating heavy menstrual bleeding and painful menstrual periods.
  • Yaz Vs. Plan B
    Many people are unaware of the difference between Plan B versus Yaz. This page on the eMedTV site discusses some of the primary differences and similarities between the two drugs, and explains how each medication works to prevent pregnancy.
  • Yaz Vs. Yasmin
    Although Yasmin and Yaz are similar in many ways, there are some important differences. This eMedTV resource explores some of the similarities and differences between Yaz vs. Yasmin, and explains how the two birth control pills work.
  • Yaz Warnings and Precautions
    Yaz can make depression worse and may affect your cholesterol. This eMedTV Web article takes an in-depth look at other important Yaz warnings and precautions, including information on who should not use this form of contraception.
  • Yazmin
    As this eMedTV page explains, Yasmin is an oral contraceptive that is used by women to prevent pregnancy. This page offers a brief overview of Yasmin, including possible side effects and general precautions. Yazmin is a common misspelling of Yasmin.
  • Yazmine
    Yasmin is a prescribed oral contraceptive used to prevent pregnancy. This eMedTV Web segment discusses how Yasmin works and explains what to tell your doctor before starting this form of contraception. Yazmine is a common misspelling of Yasmin.
  • Yeast Infection
    A yeast infection is caused by an imbalance of a fungus called Candida albicans in the vagina. This eMedTV segment offers a more detailed description of this condition, including information on risk factors, symptoms, and treatment options.
  • Yeast Infection Cure
    Several antifungal medicines have a high success rate in providing a yeast infection cure. This eMedTV article explains the specifics on the different forms of treatment that are available to treat this infection in women.
  • Yeast Infection Information
    If you have vaginal itching, burning, or irritation, you may have a yeast infection. This eMedTV resource provides some basic information on yeast infections, including a list of their most common symptoms. Also included is a link to learn more.
  • Yeast Infection Symptoms
    As this eMedTV page explains, yeast infection symptoms often range in severity, from mild itching to painful urination or intercourse. This page provides more information on possible signs and symptoms of yeast infections, including those seen in men.
  • Yeast Infection Treatment
    Common yeast infection treatment options include antifungal creams, oral drugs, or vaginal suppositories. This eMedTV article describes each of these treatments for yeast infections in detail, including the dangers in self-diagnosing a yeast infection.
  • Yeast Infections
    Yeast infections are caused by a fungus imbalance brought on by changes in the vagina's normal acidity. This eMedTV page describes these infections in detail and offers information on treating and preventing them.
  • Yeist Infection
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, vaginal yeast infections occur when there is an imbalance of fungus in the vagina. This page describes possible symptoms and treatment options. Yeist infection is a common misspelling of yeast infection.
  • Your Body Postpartum
    This media clip explains in detail how your body will change postpartum -- after giving birth.
  • Zeoman
    Xeomin helps relax muscles that cause eyelid twitching, neck pain, and wrinkles. This page of the eMedTV Web site takes a look at this prescription medicine, including how it is given and potential side effects. Zeoman is a common misspelling of Xeomin.
  • Zeomen
    As this eMedTV article explains, people with eyelid twitching, wrinkles, or neck pain may benefit from Xeomin injections. This page describes some dosing instructions and potential side effects. Zeomen is a common misspelling of Xeomin.
  • Zeomin
    Xeomin is a medication prescribed to relax muscles that cause eyelid twitching, wrinkles, and neck pain. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of how this drug works and contains a link to more details. Zeomin is a common misspelling of Xeomin.
  • Zeomin Injections
    Xeomin is a drug used to minimize wrinkles, treat eyelid twitching, and relieve neck pain. This eMedTV resource describes how this prescription medicine is given and explains how it works. Zeomin injections is a common misspelling of Xeomin injections.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.