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Desogen Dosage - Douche

This page contains links to eMedTV Women Articles containing information on subjects from Desogen Dosage to Douche. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Desogen Dosage
    The standard Desogen dosage is one pill every day, at the same time each day. This portion of the eMedTV library provides Desogen dosing guidelines, including suggestions on when and how to safely and effectively use this form of contraception.
  • Desogen Drug Interactions
    Some of the medicines that may negatively interact with Desogen include antibiotics and many seizure drugs. This eMedTV segment outlines other medications that may cause Desogen drug interactions and describes the complications that may occur.
  • Desogen Overdose
    An overdose on Desogen may cause nausea, vomiting, and vaginal bleeding. This eMedTV Web page explains that you should seek immediate medical care if you have taken too much Desogen and covers possible treatment options for a Desogen overdose.
  • Desogen Side Effects
    Nausea, headaches, and bloating are among the possible Desogen side effects. This eMedTV segment explains that although reactions to this drug are typically minor, more serious problems are possible and may require immediate medical care.
  • Desogen Uses
    Desogen is a prescription birth control pill primarily used for preventing pregnancy. As this eMedTV article explains, doctors may also sometimes recommend off-label Desogen uses, such as for treating acne, painful menstrual periods, and PMDD.
  • Desogen Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Desogen if you have a blood clotting disorder, heart disease, or liver tumors. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at some of the other possible Desogen warnings and precautions to be aware of before using the contraceptive.
  • Deuche
    Douche is a method of rinsing or cleaning out the vagina. This eMedTV article takes a further look at douching, including information on reasons why women douche and possible problems this process may cause. Deuche is a common misspelling of douche.
  • Diabetes and Laparoscopy
    Symptoms of abnormal blood sugar (such as feeling very thirsty) after a laparoscopy could signal a problem. This eMedTV resource gives information on what you need to know about diabetes, laparoscopy, and potential complications of the two.
  • Diabetes and Myomectomy
    Having diabetes can increase your risk of complications (such as infection) with a myomectomy. This eMedTV resource tells you what you need to know about diabetes and myomectomy, including the need for good communication with your doctor.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy
    Several gynecological problems can be diagnosed (and sometimes treated) using diagnostic laparoscopy. This eMedTV page gives an overview of the procedure, including how it is performed and what you should know about complications.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy -- Risks as a Diabetic
    This video clip explains some of the health risks associated with diabetes.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy -- Summary
    This video summary discusses the benefits and effectiveness of laparoscopy.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy -- The Procedure
    This video segment describes what happens during a diagnostic laparoscopy.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Alternatives
    Alternatives to laparoscopy can include ultrasound, hysteroscopy, and major abdominal surgery. This eMedTV resource describes several diagnostic laparoscopy alternatives and lists their risks, benefits, and possible complications.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Expectations
    This part of the eMedTV site talks explains that the results of your diagnostic laparoscopy will depend on what your doctor finds inside your abdomen. This article discusses the importance of having realistic diagnostic laparoscopy expectations.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Findings -- Endometriosis
    This multimedia video clip explains what endometriosis is and why it occurs.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Findings -- Overview
    This clip lists various gynecological problems that can be evaluated with laparoscopy.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Findings -- Overview of Ectopic Pregnancy
    This multimedia clip explains what happens during an ectopic pregnancy.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Findings -- Precancerous or Cancerous Growths
    This video clip describes the effects of abnormal cell growth in the organs of the pelvis.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Findings -- Uterine Fibroids
    This video clip discusses uterine fibroids, including what causes them and possible symptoms.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Abnormal Scarring
    This video clip describes abnormal scarring that may occur after this procedure.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Air Insufflation Injuries
    This video explains possible inuries that may occur due to the use of carbon dioxide during a laparoscopy.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Allergic Reaction to Medication
    This video explains why allergic reactions to medicines occur and how likely they are.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Bladder and Urinary Tract Damage
    This video explains how bladder and urinary tract damage can occur with this procedure.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Bleeding and Blood Vessel Damage
    This video explains what may happen if you have major bleeding and blood vessel damage with this procedure.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Blood Clots
    This video clip gives an overview of blood clots, including how they are treated.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Delayed Bowel Function, or Ileus
    This video file explains how, why, and when an ileus (delayed bowel function) may occur.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Final Thoughts
    This video clip discusses the likelihood of complications occurring with your procedure.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Incisional Hernia
    This video explains that an incisional hernia is a possible risk with laparoscopy.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Infection
    This interactive video discusses possible infections that may occur due to this procedure.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Intestine or Bowel Damage
    This interactive video describes possible bowel damage that may occur with this procedure.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Need for Major Abdominal Surgery
    This video discusses the possibility that major abdominal surgery may need to be considered.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Nerve Damage
    This video clip describes the risk of possible nerve damage during a laparoscopy.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy Risks -- Organ Damage
    This video explains possible organ damage that can occur during any abdominal surgery.
  • Diet for Overactive Thyroid
    If you have hyperthyroidism, it's important to eat a balanced diet. However, as this eMedTV page explains, there is no "overactive thyroid diet" proven to reduce symptoms. This article takes a look at what to eat if you have an overactive thyroid.
  • Diethylpropion
    Diethylpropion is a prescription weight loss medicine used for treating obesity. This eMedTV page explains what you should know before taking diethylpropion and offers more details on the drug's effects, possible side effects, and dosing information.
  • Diethylpropion Dosing
    For the short-acting form of diethylpropion, dosing usually starts at 25 mg three times daily. This eMedTV Web page also offers dosage recommendations for long-acting diethylpropion tablets and includes a list of tips for those taking the drug.
  • Diethylpropion for Weight Loss
    As explained in this eMedTV article, diethylpropion is a prescription drug designed to help people lose weight. This resource looks at how it works and why it should be taken exactly as prescribed. Also included is a link to more detailed information.
  • Different Types of Hysterectomy
    This video clip discusses the three different types of hysterectomy.
  • Diflican
    Diflucan is a prescription medicine commonly used for treating fungal infections. This eMedTV article covers other uses and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using the drug. Diflican is a common misspelling of Diflucan.
  • Diflucan
    Diflucan is a prescription drug used to treat yeast infections and various other fungal infections. This eMedTV Web page covers these and other uses, explains how this medicine works, offers dosing information, and more.
  • Diflucan 100 mg Tablets
    People being treated for thrush usually take Diflucan 100 mg tablets (after a 200-mg dose on day one). This eMedTV Web page also provides dosing guidelines when using this medicine to treat yeast infections and various other fungal infections.
  • Diflucan 150 mg Tablets
    People being treated for yeast infections usually take Diflucan 150 mg tablets (one single dose). This eMedTV resource also includes dosing guidelines for treating thrush and for preventing infections in bone marrow transplant recipients.
  • Diflucan 200 mg
    People with thrush usually take Diflucan 200 mg on day one, followed by 100-mg tablets thereafter. This eMedTV segment also explains how dosing works for the treatment of other conditions, such as yeast infections and meningitis.
  • Diflucan 50 mg Tablets
    With the tablet form of Diflucan, 50 mg tablets are the lowest available strength. This eMedTV resource lists the other forms and strengths of Diflucan and explains what factors your doctor may consider before making dosing recommendations.
  • Diflucan and Breastfeeding
    Diflucan (fluconazole) is known to pass through breast milk in humans. As this eMedTV page explains, some sources consider breastfeeding and Diflucan to be compatible, while others recommend using caution. This article offers more details.
  • Diflucan and Pregnancy
    Diflucan (fluconazole) may not be safe for use in pregnant women. This page on the eMedTV site provides more information on pregnancy and Diflucan, and explains what problems occurred in animals and humans when the drug was used during pregnancy.
  • Diflucan Dosage
    The standard Diflucan dosage for treating vaginal yeast infections is a single dose of 150 mg (by mouth). This eMedTV segment also provides dosing guidelines for the treatment of various other fungal infections, such as thrush and meningitis.
  • Diflucan Drug Interactions
    Quinidine, pimozide, and warfarin are among the medicines that can cause drug interactions with Diflucan. This eMedTV resource lists other products that can react negatively with Diflucan and explains what problems may occur as a result.
  • Diflucan for Yeast Infections
    Many doctors will prescribe the antifungal medicine Diflucan for yeast infections. This article from the eMedTV archives describes how this medication works and explains how it is different from other yeast infection medicines.
  • Diflucan Medication Information
    Diflucan is a prescription medication used for treating various types of fungal infections. This eMedTV resource provides more information on Diflucan, including details on how the medicine works and a list of possible side effects that may occur.
  • Diflucan Overdose
    Seizures, hallucinations, or paranoid behavior may occur when a person takes too much Diflucan. This eMedTV resource lists other potential effects of a Diflucan overdose and describes the various treatment options that are currently available.
  • Diflucan Side Effects
    Common side effects of Diflucan include vomiting, abdominal pain, and headaches. As this eMedTV article explains, while most problems are mild, some are potentially serious and require prompt medical attention (such as seizures or jaundice).
  • Diflucan Tablets
    Diflucan is a medication often prescribed to treat fungal infections. As this eMedTV page explains, unlike most yeast infection drugs, this one is not used vaginally. There are three different forms of Diflucan: tablets, oral liquid, and injection.
  • Diflucan Uses
    Various fungal infections, such as thrush, pneumonia, and yeast infections, can be treated with Diflucan. This eMedTV page discusses other approved Diflucan uses, explains how this drug can be used "off-label," and describes how the medicine works.
  • Diflucan Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Diflucan if you are taking cisapride. This eMedTV article further explains who may not be able to safely use this drug. Precautions and warnings with Diflucan for women who are pregnant or nursing are also included.
  • Diflucen
    The antifungal drug Diflucan is licensed to treat and prevent various types of fungal infections. This eMedTV segment describes this medicine in more detail and offers information on how it works. Diflucen is a common misspelling of Diflucan.
  • Diflucin
    Diflucan is an antifungal drug used to treat yeast infections and other fungal infections. This eMedTV page describes this medication in more detail and explains what you should know before taking it. Diflucin is a common misspelling of Diflucan.
  • Difulcan
    Diflucan is a prescription drug licensed to treat fungal infections, such as thrush or yeast infections. This eMedTV Web page explains what else this medicine is used for and describes how it works. Difulcan is a common misspelling of Diflucan.
  • Dinoprostone Vaginal Gel
    Dinoprostone vaginal gel is prescribed at or near childbirth when a woman's cervix has not ripened. This eMedTV article explains how this drug works to help prepare the cervix for delivery, describes possible side effects, lists safety issues, and more.
  • Dinoprostone Vaginal Gel Dosage
    This eMedTV resource explains that the standard dinoprostone vaginal gel dosage is the same for all women. This page describes when and how this medicine is given and offers some recommendations for what to expect during treatment with this vaginal gel.
  • Dinoprostone Vaginal Gel Information
    Prepidil is used in pregnant women to soften and dilate the cervix before labor and delivery. This eMedTV Web page contains more information on this prescription medication, including how Prepidil is given and why it may not be suitable for some women.
  • Dinoprostone Vaginal Gel Side Effects
    Women who receive dinoprostone vaginal gel may develop side effects like diarrhea or abnormal contractions. This eMedTV segment examines other possible problems that might occur with this drug, including serious reactions that need immediate medical care.
  • Disport
    Dysport is a drug that helps to treat certain types of muscle spasms and wrinkles. This eMedTV article takes a quick look at this product and provides a link to more detailed information. Disport is a common misspelling of Dysport.
  • Does an IUD Have Side Effects?
    Most contraceptive methods carry a risk of side effects, and the intrauterine device (IUD) is no exception. This eMedTV resource briefly describes some of the adverse reactions that may occur with an IUD, both common and rare ones.
  • Does Latisse Work?
    As this eMedTV page explains, Latisse works to enhance eyelashes by increasing the number of eyelashes and increasing the amount of time they stay in place. This page discusses the effectiveness of this medication and links to more detailed information.
  • Does NuvaRing Make You Gain Weight?
    Many hormonal contraceptives are thought to cause weight gain, but do women gain weight on NuvaRing? This eMedTV page explains whether birth control pills are likely to cause weight gain and explains if this side effect also applies to NuvaRing.
  • Does Provera Cause Weight Gain?
    If you are taking Provera, weight changes are a possible side effect. This article from the eMedTV Web site explores whether Provera causes weight gain or weight loss, and provides a link to more detailed information on possible side effects of this drug.
  • Does Vitamin B12 Work?
    Vitamin B12 is useful for treating a vitamin deficiency, but does vitamin B12 work for other conditions? This eMedTV segment lists other possible uses and explores the effectiveness of vitamin B12 for these various claimed benefits.
  • Does Vitamin B6 Work?
    As this eMedTV page explains, vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is effective for treating vitamin B6 deficiencies and related problems. However, does it work for other conditions? This article explores the effectiveness of vitamin B6 for other uses.
  • Does Vitex Work?
    As this eMedTV article explains, many women may wonder if vitex (chasteberry) works for conditions such as infertility, low breast milk supply, and menstrual problems. This page discusses the research that has been done on the effectiveness of vitex.
  • Does Yasmin Make You Gain Weight?
    Many women may wonder, "Will I gain weight on Yasmin?" As this article from the eMedTV site explains, the drug does not appear to make you gain weight. In clinical studies, weight gain was not reported as a common side effect of the birth control pill.
  • Does Yaz Make You Gain Weight?
    Many women may wonder, "Will I gain weight on Yaz?" As this article from the eMedTV archives explains, some studies showed weight gain to be a common side effect of Yaz. However, this is likely not caused by the birth control pill itself.
  • Doosh
    About 37 percent of American women ages 15 to 44 douche regularly. But, as this eMedTV segment explains, douching can make a woman more prone to bacterial infections or have problems getting pregnant. Doosh is a common misspelling of douche.
  • Dooshing
    Many doctors do not recommend douching, as it may change the chemical balance in the vagina. This eMedTV Web segment describes the process of douching and discusses the problems it may cause. Dooshing is a common misspelling of douching.
  • Douch
    Reducing odors and avoiding STDs are among the reasons why many women choose to douche. This eMedTV article gives a general overview of douching, which is a method of rinsing or cleaning out the vagina. Douch is a common misspelling of douche.
  • Douche
    Many women choose to douche, but research shows that women who do so are more prone to infections. This eMedTV article explains this method of cleaning the vagina and discusses why doctors do not recommend it.
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