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Causes of Vaginitis - Desogen Birth Control Pills

This page contains links to eMedTV Women Articles containing information on subjects from Causes of Vaginitis to Desogen Birth Control Pills. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Causes of Vaginitis
    As this eMedTV article explains, vaginitis can have many causes, such as yeast infections, chemical irritation, and bacterial vaginosis. This page explores the six most common causes and lists some of the symptoms that may appear.
  • Cervex
    This part of the eMedTV archives gives an overview of the cervix, which is part of a woman's reproductive system. This page discusses the purposes the cervix serves and where it is located. Cervex is a common misspelling of cervix.
  • Childbirth Pain Management
    This video describes epidurals and other anesthesia for use during childbirth.
  • Choosing a Birth Control Method
    If you have certain allergies or medical issues, you may not be able to use some forms of birth control. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at choosing a birth control method, including several factors to consider before making your decision.
  • Common Causes of Infertility in Women
    What are the most common causes of infertility in women? This eMedTV article has the answer. In this selection, we take an in-depth look at the health issues that can make it difficult for women to conceive, such as PCOS, endometriosis, and more.
  • Complications and Outcomes -- Laparoscopic Tubal Ligation
    This multimedia clip discusses some of the major complications that could occur.
  • Conjugated Estrogens
    Conjugated estrogens is a blend of estrogens that is found in several medicines for menopause treatment. This eMedTV page offers an overview of these estrogens, including information on the various products, potential side effects, and more.
  • Conjugated Estrogens Vaginal Cream
    Conjugated estrogens vaginal cream is licensed to treat vaginal symptoms associated with menopause. This eMedTV page offers an overview of the medicine, including information on how the cream works, potential side effects, and tips for using it.
  • Conjugated Estrogens Vaginal Cream Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that the recommended conjugated estrogens vaginal cream dosage will vary based on things such as the severity of your menopause symptoms. The starting dosage will be between 0.5 grams to 2 grams of cream applied once a day.
  • Considering Donor Eggs and Embryos
    Sometimes, donor eggs and embryos need to be considered in order to become pregnant. This eMedTV page takes a detailed look at this topic, discussing the moral, ethical, and legal issues; how this procedure is performed, possible risks, and more.
  • Considering Donor Sperm
    As this eMedTV segment explains, there are several considerations when it comes to donor sperm, including emotional and financial factors. This page describes the procedure in detail, including how to find a donor, success rates, and more.
  • Coping With Infertility
    The reality of infertility is often overwhelming for many women -- how do you cope? This eMedTV article discusses the topic in detail, with tips on dealing with uncertainty, finding the support you need, surviving the holidays, and more.
  • Copper IUD
    The copper IUD is a device prescribed to prevent pregnancy for up to 10 to 12 years. This part of the eMedTV Web site discusses this contraceptive in more detail, including how it works, possible side effects, and how it is inserted.
  • Copper IUD Birth Control Information
    The copper IUD is a device used to prevent pregnancy. Information on this birth control option is given in this eMedTV article, with details on how long it is effective and some general safety precautions. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Copper IUD Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, dosing guidelines for the copper IUD are the same for all women. This article also contains instructions on how the device is inserted, what to expect during this process, and how to make sure the device stays in place.
  • Copper IUD Side Effects
    Common side effects of the copper IUD may include bleeding between periods and heavier menstrual periods. This eMedTV segment lists other problems that may occur in some women who use this contraceptive, including serious reactions that need treatment.
  • Cyclesa
    Cyclessa is a drug that is used to prevent pregnancy. This article on the eMedTV site offers a brief overview of this birth control pill and provides a link to more detailed information. Cyclesa is a common misspelling of Cyclessa.
  • Cyclessa
    Cyclessa is a prescription birth control pill. This selection from the eMedTV archives offers an in-depth look at the drug, including detailed information on its uses, dosing guidelines, warnings, possible side effects, and more.
  • Cyclessa and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding women are not usually advised to take Cyclessa (Cesia, Velivet). This eMedTV Web page discusses Cyclessa and breastfeeding, including information on the types of birth control pills a healthcare provider may recommend instead.
  • Cyclessa and Pregnancy
    Cyclessa (Cesia, Velivet) should not be taken during pregnancy. This eMedTV selection gives an overview of Cyclessa and pregnancy, and explains how taking the drug while pregnant could increase the risk of birth defects and other problems.
  • Cyclessa Birth Control Pills
    Cyclessa is a prescription drug used to prevent pregnancy. This portion of the eMedTV library takes a quick look at this birth control pill, with information on what to discuss with your healthcare provider before using this contraceptive.
  • Cyclessa Dosage
    Cyclessa is taken once a day at the same time each day. This eMedTV page talks about the importance of taking your Cyclessa dosage correctly and also offers suggestions on when and how to take the medication, as well as what to do if you miss a dose.
  • Cyclessa Drug Interactions
    Barbiturates and antibiotics are among the drugs that can interact with Cyclessa. This eMedTV Web page discusses Cyclessa drug interactions, with a list of drugs that can interfere with Cyclessa and an overview of the results that could occur.
  • Cyclessa Overdose
    An overdose of Cyclessa (Cesia, Velivet) is unlikely to cause serious problems. This selection from the eMedTV archives takes a look at what can happen with a Cyclessa overdose, including what to do if you have taken too much of the drug.
  • Cyclessa Side Effects
    Bloating, nausea, and breast tenderness are some of the side effects you may experience with Cyclessa. This eMedTV segment gives an overview of possible Cyclessa side effects, with suggestions on what to do if they occur.
  • Cyclessa Uses
    Cyclessa is commonly used to prevent pregnancy. This page on the eMedTV Web site takes a closer look at what Cyclessa is used for, including descriptions of several "off-label" Cyclessa uses, such as treating acne or PMDD.
  • Cyclessa Warnings and Precautions
    Cyclessa can sometimes make it more difficult to wear contact lenses. This eMedTV article offers more Cyclessa warnings and precautions, including information on what to talk to your doctor about, as well as who should avoid the drug.
  • Dangers of Botox
    Botox injections in the area near the eyes can sometimes cause vision changes. This article from the eMedTV Web site explores other potential dangers of Botox and describes some of the most common side effects that have been reported with this drug.
  • Daysee
    Daysee is a combined oral contraceptive that is available by prescription only. This part of the eMedTV Web library explains how this form of birth control works, offers dosing information, and lists side effects that may occur with the pill.
  • Daysee Birth Control Information
    Taking Daysee once a day can help prevent pregnancy. More information is given in this eMedTV Web resource, with details on how this birth control pill is taken, who it is designed for, and precautions for some women who may not be able to use it.
  • Daysee Dosage
    Daysee should be taken at the same time each day to reduce the risk of pregnancy. This eMedTV article contains more information on Daysee dosing guidelines and also offers a list of general considerations for those taking the pill.
  • Daysee Side Effects
    Potential Daysee side effects include headaches, bloating, and nausea. As this eMedTV Web selection explains, while most reactions to the drug are mild, some (such as migraines or depression) may require prompt medical attention.
  • Delayed Bowel Function After a Myomectomy
    If you have delayed bowel function after a myomectomy, clear liquids will be given until function returns. This eMedTV segment explains ways in which an ileus, or temporary stoppage of bowel functions, can be treated.
  • Delayed Bowel Function Following Laparoscopy
    An ileus (a temporary stoppage of your bowel functions) can occur after laparoscopy. This eMedTV resource provides information on the causes of delayed bowel function following laparoscopy and discusses possible treatments.
  • Delayed Bowel Function Following Tubal Ligation
    An ileus (temporary stoppage of bowel functions) is a potential complication of tubal ligation. This eMedTV Web page explains why you may experience delayed bowel function after tubal ligation and lists treatment options, such as clear liquids.
  • Delayed Bowel Function, or Ileus -- Abdominal Hysterectomy Risks
    This video file explains how, why, and when an ileus (delayed bowel function) may occur following an abdominal hysterectomy.
  • Demulen
    Demulen is a birth control pill that is available by prescription. This eMedTV page offers an overview of this contraceptive, including details on the different types of Demulen, how it works, potential side effects, and tips on when and how to take it.
  • Demulen 1/35
    A doctor may prescribe Demulen 1/35 to prevent pregnancy. This page from the eMedTV Web library takes a brief look at this birth control pill, including how it works and general safety precautions. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Demulen and Breastfeeding
    Women are typically advised to avoid combined oral contraceptives (including Demulen) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV page offers more details on the problems Demulen may cause, and explains why a progestin-only pill may be better for these women.
  • Demulen and Pregnancy
    Due to the risk of problems, it is not recommended for pregnant women to take Demulen. This eMedTV article contains more information on this topic, and explains why this birth control pill is classified as a pregnancy Category X drug.
  • Demulen Birth Control
    Demulen is a type of oral contraceptive available only by prescription. This page from the eMedTV Web site provides details on this birth control pill, including Demulen's safety precautions, potential side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Demulen Birth Control Information
    Demulen is a combined hormonal contraceptive that works to prevent pregnancy mainly by stopping ovulation. This eMedTV page offers more information on Demulen, including how this birth control pill is most effectively taken and potential side effects.
  • Demulen Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that it's important to carefully follow Demulen dosing guidelines, as missing pills greatly increases your risk of pregnancy. This page covers tips on taking this birth control pill, as well as what to do if you miss any pills.
  • Demulen Drug Interactions
    Before taking any other medicine with Demulen, talk to your doctor about possible interactions. This eMedTV page lists several medicines that may cause Demulen drug interactions and explains how these reactions can increase the risk of pregnancy.
  • Demulen Overdose
    While an overdose of Demulen is unlikely to cause dangerous problems, it may cause nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV page lists other potential effects of taking too much and explains the possible treatment options that are available.
  • Demulen Side Effects
    Common side effects of Demulen may include nausea, bloating, and breakthrough bleeding. This eMedTV page describes other side effects that have been reported with birth control pills (including Demulen) and also lists potentially serious reactions.
  • Demulen Uses
    Demulen is mainly prescribed to prevent pregnancy, but it can also be taken "off-label" for other reasons. This eMedTV resource explores the uses of Demulen, including information on how this birth control pill works and why some women shouldn't take it.
  • Demulen Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Demulen if you have certain health conditions, such as heart disease. This eMedTV page lists other important precautions and warnings with Demulen to be aware of before using this pill, including what your doctor needs to know.
  • Demulin
    Demulen, a prescription birth control pill, is used to prevent pregnancy. This eMedTV Web selection provides a brief overview of the pill, including dosing guidelines and possible side effects. Demulin is a common misspelling of Demulen.
  • Depo-SubQ Provera 104
    depo-subQ Provera 104 is a medicine prescribed to prevent pregnancy and relieve pain due to endometriosis. This eMedTV article provides an overview of this drug, including details on how it works, how the injection is given, side effects, and more.
  • Depo-SubQ Provera 104 and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV page explains, depo-subQ Provera 104 (medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection) does pass through breast milk, but does not appear to harm a nursing baby. This article explains when depo-subQ Provera 104 may be used while breastfeeding.
  • Depo-SubQ Provera 104 and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV article discusses, women should not use depo-subQ Provera 104 (medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection) during pregnancy. This article describes why this drug is classified as a Category X drug and the complications it may cause.
  • Depo-SubQ Provera 104 Dosage
    The standard dose of depo-subQ Provera 104 is 104 mg of the drug injected every 12 to 14 weeks. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at dosing guidelines for this medicine, including details on what to expect when receiving this injection.
  • Depo-SubQ Provera 104 Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV article discusses, depo-subQ Provera 104 may cause interactions with a number of drugs, including antibiotics, retinoids, and corticosteroids. This page offers a detailed description of other reactions and the problems that may occur.
  • Depo-SubQ Provera 104 Injection Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, depo-subQ Provera 104 is prescribed to prevent pregnancy and relieve endometriosis symptoms. This article offers more information about these injections, including how depo-subQ Provera 104 works and potential side effects.
  • Depo-SubQ Provera 104 Overdose
    As this eMedTV article explains, overdosing on depo-subQ Provera 104 (medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection) may cause depression, breast pain, and headaches. This article describes other potential overdose symptoms, as well as treatment options.
  • Depo-SubQ Provera 104 Shot Side Effects
    Headaches and weight gain are among the possible side effects of depo-subQ Provera 104 shots. This eMedTV resource describes other potential problems that may occur with these injections and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Depo-SubQ Provera 104 Side Effects
    Headaches, weight gain, and amenorrhea are some of the common side effects of depo-subQ Provera 104. This eMedTV page provides detailed information on other possible reactions, with statistics on how often they occurred during clinical studies.
  • Depo-SubQ Provera 104 Uses
    depo-subQ Provera 104 is a drug injected just under the skin every three months to prevent pregnancy. This eMedTV page describes other approved and unapproved uses of depo-subQ Provera 104, as well as detailed information on how the medicine works.
  • Depo-SubQ Provera 104 Warnings and Precautions
    If you have breast cancer or liver disease, you may not be able to use depo-subQ Provera 104. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at important safety warnings and precautions with depo-subQ Provera 104, including what your doctor needs to know.
  • Description of a Myomectomy (Fibroid Removal) Surgery
    This interactive video clip explains what will happen during a myomectomy.
  • Desogen
    Desogen is a type of birth control pill that primarily works by stopping ovulation. This eMedTV Web page discusses how Desogen works, describes when and how to use this pill, and explains what you should know before using this form of contraception.
  • Desogen and Breastfeeding
    Combined contraceptives (such as Desogen) are usually not recommended for breastfeeding women. This eMedTV page offers more information on Desogen and breastfeeding, and explains what kind of birth control pill most doctors recommend for nursing moms.
  • Desogen and Pregnancy
    You should not intentionally use Desogen during pregnancy, as it may cause miscarriages or birth defects. This eMedTV resource discusses what to do if you are taking Desogen and pregnancy occurs, and covers why Desogen is a pregnancy Category X drug.
  • Desogen and Weight Gain
    This eMedTV page explains that although it is a popular belief that birth control pills cause weight gain, research has shown that this may not be the case. This article also covers what to do if you are taking Desogen and weight gain occurs.
  • Desogen Birth Control Pills
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, Desogen is a medication used to prevent pregnancy. This article takes a closer look at Desogen, listing some of birth control pill's potential side effects and explaining when and how it should be taken.
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